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© 2019 by radioarchitettura

Casa Sabbia

Milan, Italy - 2014 - Francesca Benedetto with Giulia Dozzio Cagnoni - Photography: Filippo Romano

The goal of this project is to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor spaces giving a synthesis of the tension between Human Being and Nature in an interior design project. A series of artificial landscapes are built emphasizing the prospective relationship between doors and frames and the different horizontal surfaces that create different scenarios and patterns through the use of tales, in some rooms designed ad hoc.

The apartment hosts a sequence of scenographies, sets representing artificial and domestic landscapes continuous and various. 

These sets create as well a landscape of clouds, marine, and lunar, celebrating the necessity of a new synthesis between interior and exterior that in this project is present in all the objects of the apartment, even in the puppets that share space with real animals, such as Sabbia the dog.

Libreria Varanasi

2017 - designed by: Francesca Benedetto Photography: Filippo Romano

This bookcase is named after Varanasi, the holy city across the Gange. The riverfront is the backdrop of all day life activities; Sanctuaries, People and Nature coexist in the same place revealing a rich and living imago mundi to his visitors. The idea of this bookcase is influenced by this imaginary. The bookcase consists in four totally independent modules with different heights and shapes that can be arranged in a variety of combinations. The space for books changes as a topography, and we can find small altars used as spaces to frame freely what we care more.  

Like in a spaceship or in Noah’s Ark we can select precisely the space for everything we want to collect in. Especially the bookcase host a doghouse able to create a living landscape in our houses.

The structure of each module is made of 19 mm plywood planks - sides exposed - and formica laminated with brushed aluminum color.

Names,Things,Cities: Divine Comedy

Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, MA - 2018 - Curated by: Francesca Benedetto Photography: Justin Knight

The title of the exhibition refers to a popular, old game: Nomi, cose, città. It was a game that could be played anywhere, using only a pen and a piece of paper. The game’s objective was to practice the knowledge of the Italian language by selecting a specific letter and having to find words that start with that letter, whether personal names, things, cities, animals, or plants. The exhibition Nomi, Cose, Città: Divina Commedia (Names, Things, Cities: Divine Comedy) works in a similar way. Its goal is to deconstruct the Divina Commedia in singular elements that are part of specific categories, and to create a visual archive of one of the most famous long-narrative poems in the world. Every illustrated image refers to main characters as well as objects, atmospheric agents, architectures, cities, landscapes, animals, and so on. The main categories include people & divinities, as well as nature & architecture. These are relevant for their specificity and individuality as well as for their coexistence in the amazing scenarios envisioned by Dante. The collection of these details of Divina Commedia’s legend has been constructed following the developing of the poem, choosing mostly one element per canto. Ultimately, we have 100 illustrations divided in three cantiche: 34 illustrations for Inferno, 33 for Purgatorio, and 33 for Paradiso. The main categories include people & divinities, as well as nature & architecture. These are relevant for their specificity and individuality as well as for their coexistence in the amazing scenarios envisioned by Dante. The collection of these details of Divina Commedia’s legend has been constructed following the developing of the poem, choosing mostly one element per canto. Ultimately, we have 100 illustrations divided in three cantiche: 34 illustrations for Inferno, 33 for Purgatorio, and 33 for Paradiso.

radioarchitettura